EOS 807 . Global Ecosystem Policy
Scientific and institutional issues pertinent to global change; scientific basis for the global Earth and biogeochemical cycles that maintain Earth's thermostasis; long-term effects of major human perturbations (greenhouse warming of the atmosphere, ozone depletion, deforestation, desertification, and biotic and soil impoverishment) and human-environment feedback mechanisms on the viability of the Earth versus the survival of the human species; effectiveness of existing and alternative national, regional, and international institutions in responding to global change. Prereq: permission. 3 cr.

EOS 810 . Introduction to Astrophysics
Review of the sun, stars, Milky Way, external galaxies, and expansion of the universe. Recent discoveries of radio galaxies, quasi-stellar objects, cosmic black-body radiation, x rays, and gamma rays precede a discussion of Newtonian and general, relativistic cosmological models, steady-state/big-bang theories, and matter-antimatter models. (Also offered as PHYS 810.) 4 cr. (Alternate years only.)

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 812 . Physics of the Ionosphere
Introduces basic plasma physics using a case study of the Earth's ionosphere and its connection both to the upper atmosphere and to the Earth's magnetosphere. Topics include single-particle motion, fluid and kinetic descriptions of ionospheric plasma, wave propagation, and instabilities. Prereq: Electrical and Magnetic I or equivalent; Calculus II. (Also offered as PHYS 812.) 4 cr.

EOS 812 . Introduction to Space Plasma Physics
The aim of the course is threefold: (i) To discuss the ways charged particles behave in a magnetic field; (ii) to give a broad introduction to the physics of the Earth's geophysical environment (the magnetosphere); and (iii) to learn how the parameters of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field and their temporal variations influence the state of the magnetosphere. The course embraces both quantitative and phenomenological aspects of the subject in roughly equal measure. During the presentation, reference to the historical and conceptual development of the space physics will be made. Prereq: basic electromagnetism.

EOS 813 . Biogeochemical Dynamics
Examines the influence of biological processes on geochemical transformations and elemental cycles from the molecular to the global scale involving both microorganisms and higher plants and animals; factors that regulate cycles; interactions among biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere; transformations of C, N, S, and trace elements Prereq: one semester each biology and chemistry. 3 cr.

EOS 815 . Global Atmospheric Chemistry
Introduction to the principles of atmospheric chemistry and their relationship to biogeochemical cycles, climate, and global change. Focus is on understanding the basic physical and chemical processes that determine the trace gas distribution in the global troposphere. An introduction to atmospheric vertical structure and global circulation dynamics provides the foundation. Chemical cycles of important C, S, and N molecules examined, including their possible perturbation by human activities. Basic photochemical processes outlined, particularly with respect to reactive nitrogen hydrocarbons, and the production/destruction of ozone. Prereq: one year college chemistry. (Also offered as ESCI 815.) 3 cr.

EOS 816 . Atmospheric Aerosol and Precipitation Chemistry
Description and examination of the processes determining the chemical and physical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol particles and precipitation. Important foci include the role of aerosol particles in the long-range transport and deposition of geochemical materials, optical properties of these particles and their impact on the global radiative balance, cloud microphysical processes relevant to both radiative effects and precipitation scavenging, and heterogeneous reactions at the solid-liquid solid-gas and liquid-gas interfaces in the atmosphere. Major segments of the course are devoted to the removal of gases and particles from the atmosphere by wet and dry deposition processes. Most attention will be paid to processes active in the troposphere, but important differences between the troposphere and stratosphere, radiative effects of stratospheric aerosol particles, and exchange between the troposphere and stratosphere addressed. Prereq: one year college chemistry or permission. 3 cr.

EOS 817 . Macro-scale Hydrology I
Focus on the numerous roles of water in the Earth System. Topics include the global water cycle, impacts of the greenhouse effect and other anthropogenic disturbances, hydrologic modeling, soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer schemes, water quality, GIS and water-related remote sensing tools. Based on extensive reading of current scientific literature, the students and instructor jointly select a research topic in macro-scale hydrology which will result in the preparation of a manuscript for publication in a refereed scientific journal. Course designed to be taken two consecutive semesters (fall and spring.) Prereq: principles of hydrology or permission. (Also offered as ESCI 717). 4 cr.

EOS 818 . Macro-scale Hydrology II
Students and instructors jointly select a research topic in macro-scale hydrology to be analyzed in depth during the course of the semester. A primary goal is to write a manuscript for publication in a refereed scientific journal. Extensive library research, reading of recent and relevant scientific literature, technical analysis, writing. Course designed to be taken two consecutive semesters (fall and spring.) Prereq: Macro-scale Hydrology I. (Also offered as ESci 818.) 4 cr. (Alternate years only.)

EOS 824 . Introduction to Ocean Remote Sensing

EOS 824 . Introduction to Ocean Remote Sensing
Introduction to a wide range of remote sensing techniques and application s in oceanography. Surveys a variety of different sensors including satellite imaging systems that operate in the visible and infrared spectral range, both passive and active microwave systems, and airborne remote sensors. The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the physical basis for remote sensing measurements, exposure to image and data analysis techniques, and the variety of remote sensing applications that exist in oceanography. Research on future remote sensing techniques and applications discussed. 3 cr. (Offered every other year.)

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 825 . Bio-Optical Oceanography and Remote Sensing
The field of bio-optical oceanography is a rich subdiscipline of ocean science that combines the physics of light and the biology of photosynthesis. It is also the basis for ocean color remote sensing. The goal of this course is to give students an introduction to the fascinating subject, and an appreciation for this field of research.

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 830 . Terrestrial Ecosystems
See syllabus.

EOS 830 . Terrestrial Ecosystems

EOS 831 . Systems Approach to Biological Ocean Science
Broad survey of one topic area in biological ocean science; topic areas change each time the course is taught and have included: biophysical interactions from micro- to megascales; and the coastal ocean. All topics are treated using an interdisciplinary "systems" approach that is intended to focus attention on the major opportunities and challenges facing ocean science now and in the future. The course comprises a structured series of presentations by guest speakers, with integration by the instructors. Prereq: ZOOL 850 and permission. May be repeated. 3 cr. (Offered every other year.)

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 844 . Biogeochemistry
Biogeochemical cycles of elements sustain life on earth and are inextricably linked with the normal functioning of ecosystems. At the same time, many of our most pressing environmental challenges involve alterations to element cycles by humans. In this course, we will examine the influence of biological, ecological and physical processes on elemental cycling and geochemical transformations from the molecular to the global scale. We will consider the roles of microorganisms, higher plants and animals and whole ecosystems, as well as factors that regulate element cycles including soils, climate, disturbance and human activities. Specific attention will be given to cycles of C, N, S, P and several trace elements. The course is intended for graduate students and advanced, upper-level undergraduates. Prereq: Minimum of one semester each biology and chemistry. 4 cr. The course format will be a combination of lecture and seminar, focusing on ideas expressed in recent journal articles.

EOS 850 . Biological Oceanography
This course is a comprehensive treatment of biological oceanography. The lectures survey biological diversity and dynamics in the ocean, and explore a wide variety of ocean habitats. The course uses two texts: Biological Oceanography: An Introduction (2nd ed.), by C.M. Lalli and T.R. Parsons (referred to as L&P); and Dynamics of Marine Ecosystems: Biological-Physical Interactions in the Oceans (2nd ed.), by K.H. Mann and J.R.N. Lazier (K&L). There are three exams during the semester and one final exam, which is designed to be synthetic but not entirely comprehensive.

EOS 854 . Ocean Waves and Tides
Introduction to waves: small-amplitude, linear wave theory, standing and propagating waves, transformation in shallow water, energy and forces on structures, generation by wind and specification of a random sea, long waves with rotation, and internal waves. Introduction to tides: description of tides in ocean tidal generation forces, equilibrium tide, and tidal analysis. Lab/project: field and lab measurements with computer analysis. Prereq: general physics; differential equations;/or permission. (Also offered as EOS 854.) Lab. 4 cr.

EOS 860 . Introductory Dynamic Oceanography
Basic physical laws governing ocean and atmospheric circulation under the influence of Earth rotation, density stratification, and friction. Topics include surface waves, wind-driven and thermohaline ocean circulation, ocean/atmosphere interaction, instabilities, fronts, and climate. Simplified mathematical models demonstrate the important principles. Prereq: college physics and differential equations or permission. (Also offered as EOS 860.) 3 cr.

EOS 864 . Introductory Paleoclimate Analysis
An overview of paleoclimate indicators for the last one million years in the context of global teleconnections (atmosphere-lithosphere-hydrosphere-cryosphere) and mathematical tools developed to interpret and link the different records of climate change. Prereq: one year calculus; one year chemistry; basic statistics;/or permission. (Also offered as EOS 864.) 4 cr.

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 865 . Natural Climate Variability
Review of paleoclimate over the last billion years of Earth history with particular emphasis on paleoclimate indications and major events. Prereq: permission. (Also listed as EOS 865.) Lab. 4 cr. (Alternate years only.)

EOS 867 . Earth System Science
Does biodiversity matter? Why is El Nino important for forecasting climate months in advance? How did the growth of the Himalayan mountain belt change sea level? These and many more questions in Earth system science will be addressed in a new course being offered in the Fall Semester 2004. EOS/ESCI 896, Concepts in Dynamical Earth System Science provides an introduction to the study of Earth as an integrated system. The 4-credit course will introduce the major components, interactions, and concepts for characterizing the modern Earth system (e.g., spheres, cycles, energy balance, equilibrium, feedbacks, linear and non-linear dynamics). Every lecture will build upon background information to address advanced themes from recent scientific literature. Research scientists from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (the nation's leading national lab in Earth sciences) will present guest lectures. Labs will focus on building models of key Earth system interactions. The course is intended for juniors or seniors with a science background, as well as incoming graduate students.

EOS 895 . Topics in Earth, Oceans, and Space
Study on an individual or group basis of topics not covered by the other listed courses. Topics may include any area relevant to interest in Earth, ocean, atmospheric, and space studies. (May be repeated.) Lab. 1-4 cr.

EOS 895 . Climate and Fisheries
This course reviews the mechanisms by which variation in year-class strength of exploited fish and invertebrates may be connected to fluctuations in climate on interannual and interdecadal time scales. Linkage may be mediated directly by changes in circulation or hydrography or indirectly by ecosystem variation in planktonic production and predator fields determining growth and mortality of early life history stages. The course content includes examination of biological and physical processes controlling recruitment and plankton productivity, climate-mediated changes in ocean circulation and temperature in the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, monitoring programs for long time series of biological and physical oceanographic data, examples of climate-zooplankton-fish linkage, modeling approaches and ecosystem-based management strategies.

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 895 . Remote Sensing of the Terrestrial Biosphere
This is a 4-credit course focused on learning analytical methods for using regional-to-global scale remote sensing data to study the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems and biosphere. Students are expected to develop a physically based understanding of global remote sensing data (e.g., from NASA?s Earth Observing System) and gain experience using these data together with models and other observations to form and test hypotheses about Earth system processes.

EOS 895 . Measurement Techniques in Atmospheric Chemistry
This course provides an overview of contemporary instrumental methods used in atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemical research. Techniques covered include: UV absorption, chemiluminescence, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, aerosol scattering and absorption, and lidar methods. Significant time is devoted to computer control and acquisition of electronic signals, sampling inlet designs, and various calibration processes. The lectures are augmented by a hands-on laboratory component where students? set-up, operate, and collect actual field data using National Instruments hardware and software.

EOS 895 . Measurement Techniques in Atmospheric Chemistry
This course provides an overview of contemporary instrumental methods used in atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemical research. Lectures will focus on specific measurement techniques, computer control and acquisition of electronic signals, sampling inlet designs, vacuum technology, as well as calibration processes. The lectures are supplemented by a hands-on laboratory component where students set-up and characterize modern research grade instrumentation along with collecting actual field data.

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 895 . Climate Change 2001
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), jointly established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program in 1988, recently released its Third Assessment Report on global climate change. In a set of three volumes, the report synthesizes the latest science results on the scientific basis, vulnerabilities, and potential mitigation of global climate change. These volumes draw on the contributions of thousands of scientists from around the world, and serve as the central set of references on global climate change for both scientists and policy makers alike. In this seminar, we will read and discuss these three reports. Participants should have a strong foundation in science, be prepared to read, assimilate, and discuss large quantities of scientific information, and will be expected to contribute to and lead class discussions.

EOS 895 . Physics and Chemistry of the Solar System
Topics include an introduction into stellar formation and evolution, and a general description of the Solar System, its formation and evolution. Other topics include the Sun and Heliosphere; planets, moons, and small bodies; and the interaction of plants with solar and galactic particles. Material will include recent observations from space missions that involve UNH scientists.

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 895 . New England's Changing Climate
This course examines the current state of New England meteorology and atmospheric chemistry, how the atmospheric environment has changed over the last century, and possible future changes. The seasonal cycle in New England?s physical and chemical weather is explored in the context of global-to-local forcing. Simple models of key synoptic- to micro-scale processes are developed. Century-long instrumental records of New England and hemispheric-global climate change are explored. Statistical and GIS tools are used to quantify the influence of global-to-local forcings and processes, both natural and anthropogenic, on New England?s climate over this time period. Strategies for predicting change in New England?s atmospheric environment are examined with emphasis on uncertainties and research needed to reduce these uncertainties.

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 895 . Human-Climate Interactions
This course will focus on the climatic impacts of human activity (land use changes and fossil fuel/other emissions), as well as the feedbacks between climate change and the land/sea surface, hydrology, productivity, etc. The conceptual feedback loop is closed by reactive policy-making in response to observations and modeling of the consequences of anthropogenically-induced climate changes. The tools developed in this course bear on "societally relevant" problems now being touted by congress, funding agencies, and others. As such, this course will place the science in the context of public needs and human impacts.

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 895 . Introduction to the Climate System
See syllabus.

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 895 . Advanced Remote Sensing Methods for Earth System Research
This course focuses on learning analytical methods for using regional-to-global scale remote sensing data to study the Earth System. The tools and techniques of remote sensing will be discussed with the aim of developing the skills required for future research on a variety of topics ? such as the structure and function of the terrestrial biosphere, the cryosphere, and aquatic systems. Emphasis will be on developing a physically based understanding of global remote sensing data (e.g. from NASA?s Earth Observing System, ESA platforms, aircraft platforms if appropriate), and on gaining experience using these data together with models and other observations to form and test hypotheses about Earth system processes.

EOS 895 . Quantitative Methods in Earth System Science
A one-credit seminar that satisfies NRESS seminar requirements, and is essentially an environmental problem solving session where students go to the board. The text for the course will be "Consider a Cylindrical Cow," by John Harte.

EOS 895 . Concepts in Earth System Science
This course has two major, approximately equal, parts. The first covers geophysical processes and modeling common to all dynamical Earth System research. The second part consists of two separate tracks, of which students choose one, to cover dynamical concepts pertinent to sub-disciplines in meteorology and biogeochemistry. The course concludes with a short common session to share the lessons of the sub-disciplinary applications.

EOS 895 . Space Instrumentation
Modern space-based instrumentation provides extremely sophisticated and exciting measurements across a broad range of scientific disciplines. This course will explore, in detail, a selection of state-of-the-art instruments, and their design challenges, for both in situ measurement (plasma, electric and magnetic fields, composition, etc.) and remote observations (gamma rays, multi-spectral photons, neutral atoms). We will probe the physical capabilities and limitations of the measurements and the creative engineering approaches required to meet the severe constraints on weight, power, and telemetry that are imposed in space missions.

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 895 . Earth System Science-Understanding Our Global Environment
Studies over the past few decades of the continents, oceans, atmosphere, biosphere, and ice cover have revealed that these are components of a dynamic and complex world. Interactions among these components have a profound effect on Earth's history and evolution. Humans, due to increasing populations and technological advances, are no longer a passive part of the Earth system. Rather, we have begun to modify the components of the Earth system through our industrial and agricultural practices. This course seeks to provide a basic understanding of the Earth system on a global scale by describing how the various components (atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere) and their interactions have evolved and how they function. These topics will be explored through analysis of the physical climate system, atmospheric chemical and biogeochemical cycles, past change in the Earth System, and modeling of the Earth system.

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 896 . Dynamics of Global Marine Ecosystems
This course provides an overview of the marine ecosystem dynamics, with considerable emphasis on the physical forcings and biological responses. It is now known that to adequately understand the geographic and temporal variability in the marine ecosystems one must accurately describe biological and physical interactions over a multitude of scales. Processes will be highlighted at different scales from less than a kilometer to global scales, and biogeographic methods will be considered in detail to illustrate the transfer of processes across the scales considered. Considerable use will be made of satellite data from different sources as a means of observing and understanding the distribution and dynamics of specific biological-physical interactions in the ocean.

EOS 896 . Concepts in Dynamical Earth System Science
This course has two major, approximately equal, parts. The first covers geophysical processes and modeling common to all dynamical Earth System research. The second part consists of two separate tracks, of which students choose one, to cover dynamical concepts pertinent to sub-disciplines in meteorology and biogeochemistry. The course concludes with a short common session to share the lessons of the sub-disciplinary applications.
3 cr. Instructors: M. Prentice, H.Mao, S. Frolking

Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 896 . Advanced Remote Sensing II
This one-semester group project course focuses on doing original research. Class participants work as a team, with the instructors, to design and carry our a remote sensing project and to write a manuscript for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. Class format: weekly group discussions (times determined by participants). Prerequisite: EOS/ESCI 895 (Advanced Remote Sensing I) or permission of the instructors.

EOS 896 . Bio-Optics and Primary Production
Examines factors affecting distribution of light in the oceans and lakes and how this interacts with life, specifically phytoplankton. Topics range from optically important, in-water constituents and their relationships with optical properties of the water column to ocean color remote sensing and oceanic primary production. Uses recent literature to illustrate current knowledge and the role of phytoplankton on a global scale. Labs focus on measuring optical properties in the lab and at sea, modeling the in-water light field, using remotely sensed data, and investigating phytoplankton photophysiology.

EOS 896 . Global Marine Ecosystems
This course will provide an overview of the marine ecosystem dynamics, with considerable emphasis on the physical forcings and biological responses. It is now known that to adequately understand the geographic and temporal variability in the marine ecosystems, one must accurately describe biological and physical interactions over a multitude of scales. Processes will be highlighted at different scales from less than a kilometer to global scales, and biogeographic methods will be considered in detail to illustrate the transfer of processes across the scales considered. Considerable use will be made of satellite data from different sources as a means of observing and understanding the distribution and dynamics of specific biological-physical interactions in the ocean.

EOS 901 . EOS Seminar
Introduction to the fundamental components of the Earth system, such as the biosphere, cryosphere, hydrosphere, and its environment in space. Basic concepts are presented in a lecture format by selected EOS faculty according to their research specialization. To familiarize the student with the literature in earth, oceans, and space science and engineering, students are expected to contribute to a discussion of current topics of interest in the literature. 1 cr. Cr/F.

EOS 940 . The Physics of Fluids
Fluid Mechanics is a traditional subject and its manifold ramifications has been the concern of mankind for millennia. Thus we read in the Book of Proverbs: "There are three things which are too wonderful for me....which I know not...The way of the eagle in the air... The way of the ship in the midst of the sea."

The flow of blood in the veins, the leaves rustling in the wind, the breaking of water waves, heavier-than-air transportation, the transition from organized to chaotic motions, the formation of thin boundary layers near solid objects traveling in a fluid obtained by Ludwig Prandtl in an eight-page opus in 1904, the 'annus mirabilis' of fluid mechanics, and many others, illustrate the great variety of phenomena which fluid mechanics deals with.

Many of these topics will be addressed in this course.
Course Syllabus (PDF)

EOS 954 . Heliospheric and Galactic Physics
Modern space-based instrumentation provides extremely sophisticated and exciting measurements across a broad range of scientific disciplines. This course will explore, in detail, a selection of state-of-the-art instruments, and their design challenges, for both in situ measurement (plasma, electric and magnetic fields, composition, etc.) and remote observations (gamma rays, multi-spectral photons, neutral atoms). We will probe the physical capabilities and limitations of the measurements and the creative engineering approaches required to meet the severe constraints on weight, power, and telemetry that are imposed in space missions.

EOS 954 . Solar Wind and Cosmic Rays
Examines the solar wind and its effects on cosmic rays; the basic equations of the solar wind: mass, momentum, angular momentum, and energy balance; transport processes; waves, shocks, and instabilities in the solar wind; basic equations of energetic particle transport; solar modulation of solar and galactic cosmic rays; interaction of energetic particles with shock waves. Salient data are reviewed.

EOS 955 . Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics
Applies principles of fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics to the Earth?s atmosphere and oceans and to space plasmas. Emphasizes common problems and techniques. Topics include mass, momentum, energy conservation; static equilibriums; quasigeostrophic flow; waves (acoustic-gravity, planetary, magnetoacoustic); surface waves in the ocean and in space; instabilities (convective, baroclinic Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin Helmholz); boundary layer problems (Ekman layers, Stewartson layers, tearing modes; resonance absorption); supersonic flows (the solar wind, shock waves). Prereq: MATH 845 and 846, or PHYS 931. (Also offered as EOS 955.) 3 cr. (Normally offered every other year.)

EOS 955 . Special Topics in Earth, Oceans, and Space Science
1-4 cr.

EOS 964 . Advanced Paleoclimate Analysis
Extensive readings and problem solving concerned with the interpretation of climate change focused on new developments in the interpretation of ice core records. Ice core records viewed as a framework for other proxy records of climatic change and as analogs for future change. Prereq: ESCI 864 or EOS 864;/or permission. (Also offered as EOS 964.) May be repeated. 4 cr.

EOS 987 . Magnetospheres
Introduces plasma physics of the interaction of solar and stellar winds with planets having internal magnetic fields, most predominantly, the Earth. Both MHD and kinetic descriptions of internal and boundary processes of magnetospheres as well as treatment of the interaction with collisional ionospheres. Flow of mass, momentum, and energy through such systems. Prereq: PHYS 951; 952;/or permission. (Also offered as EOS 987.) 3 cr. (Normally offered every other year.)

EOS 988 . High Energy Astrophysics
One-semester course on the physical principles underpinning the field of high energy astrophysics. Subjects covered include production, detection, and transport processes of neutral and charged high energy particles and photons. Emphasizes the applications of these processes to the detection and measurement problem and theory of telescope design. Uses astrophysical examples to illustrate the subject matter. First part serves as a basis for discussing the astrophysics of the heliosphere, including solar flares, galactic and solar cosmic rays, and the influence of the Earth?s magnetic field on the cosmic rays. Prereq: PHYS 941; 942; 944. (Also offered as EOS 988.) 3 cr. (Normally offered every other year.)

EOS 995 . Regional Air Quality
A review of measurement programs focused on examining air quality in various regions of the globe with particular emphasis on New England. Sources of data will be identified from measurement campaigns, emission inventories, and meteorological information required for interpretation of atmospheric observations of chemistry and dynamics on a regional scale. An important component will be identification of the uncertainties associated with each of these databases. Particular emphasis will be placed on quantitative analysis of photochemical, radiative, and heterogeneous processes influencing atmospheric chemistry. A primary goal of the course is a rigorous introduction to the modeling of atmospheric emissions, dynamics, and photochemistry and their application to regional studies.

EOS 995 . Modeling & Analysis of Biogeochemical Cycles
Course topics include introduction to modeling (stella modeling, systems dynamics, and biogeochemistry), data analysis, models and model evaluation. Students will do a modeling project.

Course Syllabus (PDF)